Magical Morzine and silly snaps from the slopes

In my last post I wrote about how I booked an amazing ski holiday in France for myself and my friends for mere pennies (well… almost). What I didn’t tell you (although you might have guessed from the photos) was how much fun the trip was.

It’s been a few years since I last skied and it felt so good to be back on the slopes, and with some of my best friends too.

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Not only did we tear down the pistes until we thought our legs would fall off…

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We also posed…

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And postured…

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And were super-silly.

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We apres-skied…

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And apres, apres-skied…

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And, um, during-skied…

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In style.

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Sadly we did have one accident, but Jess was seriously brave and despite a broken ankle managed to valiantly flirt with the ruggedly handsome French paramedics.

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We also ate and ate and ate.

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Even in the quieter moments though, we were all just thrilled to be in the mountains, in Morzine and in each other’s company.

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I’ve been to the Morzine and Les Gets ski area twice before, and although previously I’ve stayed in Les Gets and probably like it more due to its cutesy village vibe, I enjoyed the fact that Morzine was a little livelier on this particular trip. We did the rounds in the apres-ski bars, but by far the coolest and most interesting place we went was Le Bec Jaune, a craft beer bar that could have been plucked straight out of east London, were it not full of seasonnaires rather than hipsters.

We ate on the mountain several times and found the prices fairly reasonable — about 3 euros for chips, 3.5 euros for a chocolat chaud, 4-6 euros for a beer and around 7 euros for a big cheese and ham crepe or galette. Otherwise we bought lunch to take up with us from the Patisserie Bonbonniere, which had gorgeous quiches, baguettes, pastries and cakes, as well as some of the most tempting truffles I’ve ever laid eyes on. I really recommend anything they make with custard baked into it too, especially the raspberry and blueberry tarts and the “croix savoyardes”. They also make bread rolls with bacon and/or cheese inside, which are almost like meals in themselves.

We only ate out once — at La Grange, which was recommended both by our chalet and my brother who had been to Morzine a month earlier. I started with a delectably sweet tomato and shallot tarte tatin followed by hearty tartiflette, while my friends grilled meat on a hot plate. It was full of groups and families, and what we thought at the end of the night was them being slow bringing the bill turned out to be a deliberate move to keep us back so we could drink shots of  tropical fruit-flavoured rum with the waiters.

Even as someone who will happily tackle all level of slope, I find there’s enough in the basic Les Gets/Morzine ski area to keep me happy for a week. If I return for a fourth time, though, I’m definitely going to get the full Portes du Soleil pass so that I can see what the likes of Avoriaz and Chatel have to offer, as well as testing my mettle on the notorious Swiss Wall! On a clear day, head over to the Mont Chery slopes in Les Gets for fabulous reds and challenging blacks, which you can tackle while gazing across the Alps at Mont Blanc. The lifts were the busiest I’ve ever seen them when we were there due to French school holidays, but Mont Chery was reliably quiet, and there were still moments at the end of long, action-packed days when I found myself coasting serenely along the piste with not another soul in sight.

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3 Comments

    • March 27, 2014 / 9:02 pm

      You should give it a go some time! It’s worth it for the scenery alone! xx